Isosceles Tetrahedron

(Drag on image to rotate shape in three dimensions.)

  1. Isosceles Tetrahedron, the basic block, showing positions for magnets.
  1. Two blocks join to form a rhombic pyramid.
  1. Three join to form a skewed triangular prism.
  1. Four join to form one half of a tetrahedron (see 10).
  1. Adding a block to each face of a central block indicates the basic repeating six block unit with square cross section, the sixth block occupying the groove at one end or the other.
  1. Two rhombic pyramids (four blocks) join to form a vertically shortened octahedron.
  1. Two prisms (six blocks) join at a shared short edge to form a rhombahedron, four of which in turn form a rhombic dodecahedron (below).
  1. Five blocks join to form a symmetric shape which indicates the basic repeating six block unit with triangular cross section, the sixth block being added at one end of the other.
  1. Stacking four square cross section units in a larger square indicates how blocks can be stacked in larger numbers, in this example 64 blocks with a central rhombic dodecahedron (11).
  1. Adding blocks to four alternate (tetrahedral) faces of the octahedron (above) produces a double sized copy of the basic block.
  1. Kepler's rhombic dodecahedron, built from 24 blocks. These "tile" all of space in the pattern of close packed spheres.
  1. A single block is formed where the edges of two square beams intersect.